Asprin Bufferin, Anacin, ASA

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GENERIC NAME: ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID, ASPIRIN, ASA

BRAND NAME: Bufferin, Anacin, APC, among others CLASS: analgesic; antipyretic; anti-inflammatory

Mechanism of Action:

In small doses aspirin blocks thromboxane A2, a potent platelet aggregate and vasoconstrictor. This property has lead to its use in the acute phase of management of the myocardial infarction. Decreased platelet aggregation.

Indications and Field Use:

Chest pain or other signs/symptoms suggestive of acute myocardial infarction ECG changes suggestive of acute myocardial infarction Unstable angina Pain, discomfort, fever in adult patient only

Contraindications:

Bleeding ulcer, hemorrhagic states, hemophilia Known hypersensitivity to salicylates or other non-steroidal anti- inflammatories that has lead to hypotension and/or bronchospasm Children and adolescents (prehospital personnel should not administer ASA to this age group)

Adverse Reactions:

Use with caution in the patient with history of asthma. Anaphylactic reactions in sensitive patients have occurred; skin eruptions Other side effects rare with single dose

NOTES ON ADMINISTRATION

Incompatibilities/Drug Interactions: Not applicable with single dose therapy

Adult Dosage:

Cardiac: 160- 325 mg (2-4 pediatric chewable tabs), chew or swallow Pain/discomfort/fever: 325 mg po (4 pediatric chewable tablets), chew or swallow

Pediatric Dosage:

Not recommended for prehospital use in children

Routes of Administration:

Oral

Onset of Action:

20-30 minutes

Peak Effects:

2 hours

Duration of Action:

4-6 hours

Dosage Forms/Packaging: 81 - 325 mg tablet individually packaged

Arizona Drug Box Supply Range: PARAMEDIC: INTERMEDIATE: BASIC:

Special Notes:

36 - 100 Tablets 36 - 100 Tablets 36 - 100 Tablets

> Baby ASA is heat and light sensitive. The odor of acetic acid (vinegar-like smell) indicates degradation of product

Drug Profile for EMT-B Administration of Aspirin

This is the Arizona Department of Health Services’ recommendation for the use of this drug by an EMT-Basic in the prehospital setting.

GENERIC NAME: ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID, ASPIRIN, ASA

CLASS: analgesic; antipyretic; anti-inflammatory Mechanism of Action:

In small doses aspirin blocks thromboxane A2, a potent platelet aggregant and vasoconstrictor. This property has led to its use in the acute phase of management of the myocardial infarction. Decreased platelet aggregation.

Indications and Field Use:

Chest pain or other signs/symptoms suggestive of acute myocardial infarction

Contraindications:

Bleeding ulcer, hemorrhagic states, hemophilia Known hypersensitivity to salicylates or other non-steroidal anti- inflammatories that has led to hypotension and/or bronchospasm Children and adolescents (prehospital personnel should not administer ASA to this age group)

Adverse Reactions:

Use with caution in the patient with history of asthma. Anaphylactic reactions in sensitive patients have occurred; skin eruptions Other side effects rare with single dose

NOTES ON ADMINISTRATION

Incompatibilities/Drug Interactions: Not applicable with single dose therapy

Adult Dosage:
Cardiac: 160-325 mg (2-4 81 mg tabs), chew or swallow

Pediatric Dosage:
Not recommended for prehospital use in children
Drug Profile for EMT-B Administration of Aspirin

This is the Arizona Department of Health Services’ recommendation for the use of this drug by an EMT-Basic in the prehospital setting.

Routes of Administration:

Oral

Onset of Action:

20-30 minutes

Peak Effects:

2 hours

Duration of Action:

4-6 hours

Dosage Forms/Packaging:

81-325 mg tablet individually packaged

Recommended Arizona Drug Box Minimum Supply:

324 mg

Special Notes:

> ASA is heat and light sensitive. The odor of acetic acid (vinegar-like smell) indicates degradation of product 

© Matt Dillard 2012